In my work as a mental health and wellbeing coach, I have worked with many people with ADHD.

Having been diagnosed with the neurological condition myself in 2018, I’ve realised that I have over five decades of living with the condition, managing it, and attempting to fit my neurodiverse brain into a neuro typical world.

I consider this to be my greatest qualification in supporting you!

Regardless of your situation, whether newly diagnosed, diagnosed for a long time, or no diagnosis at all (just a niggly suspicion, and a list of symptoms) coaching has been proven to be very helpful in supporting people to manage the inherent challenges of living and thriving with ADHD.

Here are a few more details, and some general tips for dealing with ADHD.

In coaching sessions we would look at several areas.

We might look at any feelings around having the neurological condition, for example, it is normal to feel a sense of grief at first diagnosis, especially if you are older, or you might want to look at if it would be helpful to get a diagnosis at all.

I have heard it said that ADHD rarely travels alone. It’s quite likely that you may have other neuro differences such as dyslexia, or be experiencing mental health issues such as depression or anxiety. It’s important that we work to address the whole picture and consider how other challenges may be affecting you and your ADHD.

When it comes to looking at organisational and executive function issues, we follow a structured approach.

We can work together to identify your strengths and weaknesses.

No two ADHD-ers will look the same; we all have that special ‘spiky profile’; you may be excellent at time keeping and terrible at keeping the place tidy, or vice versa.

We can pinpoint areas are causing you the greatest concern and then work to enable you to develop better strategies and a better working relationship with these areas of difficulty.

The focus is always about you being the boss and finding ways to help you thrive, with your different, quirky but ultimately wonderful brain.

Sessions can take place either online via zoom or in person at Hapus HQ in Cardiff.

Here is what others have had to say.

If you are interested please get in touch, we would love to hear from you.

Whatever you decide, please know that whilst ADHD can be a real challenge to live with, it is ultimately not a disaster but a real blessing. Please do get in touch if you have any questions

best wishes Sian x